Review of: Gerry Skilton

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On 29.01.2020
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Und Serien an einer bsen Gegenstck, den Verkauf dieses Jahr fr dich umfassende Nachforschungen anstellen und Cinenet ganz geschlossen, andere Szenen folgende Video und eindrucksvollen schauspielerischen Ttigkeit bei der Big Sick erzhlt aber geblockt.

Gerry Skilton

Alle Infos zu Gerry Skilton, bekannt aus Crocodile Dundee II und Crocodile Dundee in Los Angeles. Dieses Stockfoto: PAUL HOGAN, GERRY SKILTON, STEVE RACKMAN, CROCODILE DUNDEE, - EF8CHB aus der Alamy-Bibliothek mit Millionen von. Gerry Skilton ist ein australischer Schauspieler des und frühen Jahrhunderts. Skilton spielt am besten die Figur Nugget in allen drei Filmen der Crocodile Dundee-Reihe: Crocodile Dundee, Crocodile Dundee II und Crocodile Dundee in Los.

Gerry Skilton Suchtreffer im Shop

Gerry Skilton ist ein australischer Schauspieler des und frühen Jahrhunderts. Skilton spielt am besten die Figur Nugget in allen drei Filmen der Crocodile Dundee-Reihe: Crocodile Dundee, Crocodile Dundee II und Crocodile Dundee in Los. Serien und Filme mit Gerry Skilton: Crocodile Dundee in Los Angeles · Mr. Reliable – Eine wahre Geschichte · Crocodile Dundee II · Crocodile Dundee – Ein . Gerry Skilton ist ein Schauspieler. Entdecke seine Biographie, Details seiner Karriere und alle News. Gerry Skilton. Persönliche Infos. Geschlecht. Male. Offizielle Website. -. Bekannt aus. Zu sehen in 0. Entdecke unsere Special Channels. Filme, die jetzt live sind. Gerry Skilton's films include Crocodile Dundee - Ein Krokodil zum KüssenundCrocodile Dundee II. Wer synchronisierte Gerry Skilton die deutschen Synchronstimmen von Gerry Skilton - Alle Besetzungen in der Übersicht. Alle Infos zu Gerry Skilton, bekannt aus Crocodile Dundee II und Crocodile Dundee in Los Angeles.

Gerry Skilton

Mark Blum: Richard Mason; Michael Lombard: Sam Charlton; Ritchie Singer: Con; Maggie Blinco: Ida; Steve Rackman: Donk; Gerry Skilton: Nugget; Terry Gill:​. Schauspieler: Crocodile Dundee:Paul Hogan · Linda Kozlowski · John Meillon · David Gulpilil · Ritchie Singer · Maggie Blinco · Steve Rackman · Gerry Skilton. Alle Infos zu Gerry Skilton, bekannt aus Crocodile Dundee II und Crocodile Dundee in Los Angeles. Gerry Skilton FSK Herzlichsten Dank wieder einmal für Eure fantastische Hilfe. Herzlichen Dank. Dort erliegt sie dem Charme des eigenwilligen Crocodile Dundee und lädt ihn zu einem Besuch ihrer Heimatstadt ein Wie immer Flight Plan - schnell - professionell :- Bis zum nächsten Mal! David Gulpilil. Hallo Denis, Kunde ist super zufrieden! Bobby Alto. Gerry Skilton

VI Barack Obama took his presidential oath on January 20, , delivering his inaugural address. The moment was historic, as he was officially recognized as the first African-American president.

Pepper s Lonely Hearts Club Band, to universal acclaim. In stark contrast to their early works, the album embraced sonic experimentation and broke several barriers.

II The LP, their eighth, has gone down as one of the greatest works of recorded art, claiming the top spot on Rolling Stone magazines greatest albums of all-time list.

III Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band incorporated a wide range of diverse musical styles, including music hall, western classical music, vaudeville, rhythm n blues, musique concrete, and Indian classical music.

The sequencing of tracks on the album suggests a song-cycle; the album rounds off with its opening track song before the coda.

V Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band is one of the biggest selling albums of all time, with an impressive amount of more than 32 million units sold worldwide.

I On April 6, , Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, placed in his hand, a lump of salt and uttered the words, "I am shaking the foundations of the British Empire".

This historic scene is etched in the memory of India's freedom struggle, as the result of Gandhi's Dandi March. II The march was a prime example of Gandhi's 'civil disobedience' movement.

His objective was to protest against the steep tax levied by the British on salt. III On March 2, , a little before the historic event, Gandhi sent a letter to the British viceroy, Lord Irwin, telling him about his intent to undertake this journey and urging him to revise the official colonial position on the matter.

IV Leading a team of eighty freedom fighters, Gandhi began the momentous march at his Sabarmati ashram. The Dandi March took an incredible 24 days in total.

V The momentous march included freedom fighters from all different states, from various walks of life, and across different cultures.

Making a lasting impression at the time. VI The youngest participant in the march was a year old student from Gujarat named Vittal Liladhar, while the oldest was Gandhi himself.

He was 61 years old. The piece is known for its use of tribal rhythms and dissonance. III The premiere of "The Rite of Spring" was met with a chaotic response from the audience, who argued so loudly that the dancers missed their cues from the orchestra.

Roerich's name accompanied the composer's in the title pages of the early publications of the score. V Melodically, "The Rite of Spring" continued Stravinsky's tradition of drawing from Russian folk culture; however, the piece introduced musical rhythms and motifs that were more chaotic.

II Hillary later spoke of the historic moment, recalling that the men shook hands in "good Anglo-Saxon fashion", but Tenzing quickly acknowledged the glorious feat by clasping his partner in his arms and slapping his back.

III Due to unfavorable conditions and unpredictable weather, the pair would only spend 15 minutes at the peak, after which they hastily began their retreat to the base.

IV After reaching the south summit of Everest at 9 am, an adjacent ridge took a slight dip before rising abruptly about 40 feet before the true summit.

V Hillary overcame the final obstacle by chimneying between the rock pillar and a block of ice. This came to be known as the 'Hillary step'.

VI It was revealed years later in Tenzing's biography, which one of the two had reached the peak first. The two men stayed true to their pact to keep it a secret.

On August 12, , a Boeing plane that was operating this route crashed at Osutaka Ridge near Mount Osutaka, killing people. Just twelve minutes later, the aircraft suffered a sudden rapid decompression which caused a large part of the aircraft's tail to break off.

This then resulted in the loss of the plane's hydraulic controls. III The pilots made numerous attempts to regain control of the aircraft but failed.

The plane disappeared from radar at PM, crashing at an elevation of 5, feet. IV Investigators concluded that this decompression was caused by a faulty repair of the aircraft following a tailstrike incident at Osaka International Airport seven years earlier.

It was found that those who had carried out the repair did not follow Boeings' approved repair methods. V The crash took place during the Obon holiday period in Japan when many people go on trips to resorts or visit their hometowns.

Obon is an ancient Japanese Buddhist custom where people honor the spirits of their ancestors by visiting and cleaning their graves.

VI Four women, one of whom was an off-duty flight attendant, survived the crash. Rescue teams only managed to reach them the next morning.

Medical staff later discovered that more people would have survived, but they eventually died due to shock or injuries.

It depicts a whirling night sky over a village on a hillside. He had checked himself into it after suffering from manic bouts and depression.

Ironically, the artist himself considered it to be a failure, evident in his now-famous letter to his brother.

IV Van Gogh was an expressive painter whose works emphasized the perspective of the observer. V Van Gogh's treatment of colors alludes to mist, fire, and the sea, and portrays the transcendental quality of the night illustrated by the dramatic glitter of the stars.

The Space Shuttle Columbia disintegrated during its re-entry into the atmosphere, killing all seven crew members on board.

II The disaster was caused by a piece of foam insulation that broke off and damaged the edge of the orbiter's left wing during liftoff.

Upon re-entry into the Earth's atmosphere, hot gases penetrated the spacecraft's heat shield, causing it to become unstable and break apart.

III Cameras were able to capture the moment when the piece of foam broke off and struck the wing. Engineers suspected that the damage caused was serious; however, NASA management concluded that there was little that can be done by the crew to fix it.

The first signs of trouble appeared , feet above California at AM and the first debris began falling over Texas at AM.

V Residents in the area heard a loud boom at AM and reported seeing streaks of smoke and debris falling to the ground. The crew's remains and spacecraft debris were found in more than 2, different locations in East Texas, Arkansas, and Louisiana.

VI The Space Shuttle program was suspended for more than two years. An investigation later determined that it would have actually been possible for the crew to repair the damage, or that the crew could have been safely evacuated while it was still in orbit.

I The American Revolution is a period in history when the colonials of the Empire of Great Britain in America fought for freedom and independence from the crown.

II Numerous battles were waged, and ultimately, the colonies won their freedom and became the sovereign country that we now know as the United States of America.

The war for American independence erupted in and ended in Not every settlement took part in the movement for independence, however.

Ultimately, 13 colonies decided to join in the cause, fighting for liberty from British control. War did not break out immediately, though.

First, complaints and quarrels were brought up. V Soon, several minor skirmishes between the colonials and the local British forces transpired. From that point on, everything went from bad to worse, and after several years, it reached a point of no return.

The colonists and the British Empire went to war. VI Every colony followed its own local governance.

In , they voted in representatives who would voice their grievances and advance their needs during the First Continental Congress.

This served as the first attempt of the colonials to band together and create one government. Cunard had 2. II At the time of its introduction in , the Lusitania was the largest passenger ship in the world.

In October , it broke a record as the first ship to cross the Atlantic in less than five days. These records were later broken by its sister ship, the RMS Mauretania.

War munitions were hidden on the Lusitania, but the ship was never used as an AMC due to all the coal it has consumed. IV The Lusitania carried a total of 1, passengers and crew on its final voyage from the port of New York to Liverpool on May 1, Most of the passengers were British nationals, plus several Canadians and Americans.

Commander William Thomas Turner was the captain of the ship. V It only took the Lusitania 18 minutes to sink after it was hit by a German torpedo.

Due to the speed at which the sinking took place, only six of the 48 lifeboats were successfully launched. As a result, of the people on board were killed.

I Though the roots of the American Civil Rights Movement date back to the s, the movement reached its peak in , culminating in Dr.

Martin Luther King's famous I have a dream speech. II A year later, President Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of into motion, aimed at preventing any form of discrimination to take place when one was applying for employment in the United States.

King, along with a group of civil rights leaders, lead the way on two marches, ending in Montogomery, in Alabama on March IV On August 6, , Lyndon Johnson set the Voting Rights Act of in motion, which was a law eliminating the use of literacy tests as a voting prerequisite.

V Three years later, on August 11, , the Movement s efforts truly paid off as the Civil Rights Act of came to life, protecting the right of every American for equal housing opportunities, irrespective of their race or national origin.

VI Today, the Civil Rights Movement of the United States has gone down as one of its landmark movements, echoing the sentiments behind many efforts of the 21st century to bring equality, peace, and harmony.

The war was fought over the Falkland island, also known as Islas Malvinas, and its associated island dependencies. II Argentina had claimed sovereignty over the islands since the early 19th century; but in , England seized complete control over the region, expelling the remaining Argentinian occupants.

III In the early months of , Lieut. Leopoldo Galtieri turned his back on a long-running agreement with Britain.

IV The British captured 11, Argentine prisoners by the end of the war, all of whom were released sometime after. Argentina announced that lives had been lost, while the British suffered around casualties.

V Argentina's military government suffered as a result of its failure to support its forces in an invasion that it had ordered; the country resumed its civil rule in VI Margaret Thatcher, Britain's Prime Minister, capitalized on the widespread patriotic support at the time, into a gigantic victory for her conservative party the very same year.

I Women were considered omens of misfortune on boats. However, this kind of belief did not discourage ladies eager to follow their pirating dreams.

Mary Read and Anne Bonny were among the most famous pirates who worked alongside each other as men in the Caribbean.

II It is quite a widely held mistaken belief that pirates wore eye patches to cover gaping eye sockets. In reality, the purpose of such strange eyewear was far more intriguing.

Eye patches were worn to allow the other eye to become consistently adapted to darkness. III Pirates were not entirely thugs. As a matter of fact, they were surprisingly just and reasonable with their crew members in terms of labor rights.

Captains followed systems wherein members of the ship would be given compensation for injuries they incurred while on duty. IV While we've all heard stories of people being forced to walk the plank, it was actually an uncommon occurrence.

That's not to say burglars and scallywags didn't have a terrible punishment awaiting them. Keelhauling was a widely used sentence among pirates.

V The truth is, pirates included people from all walks of life. There is a renowned pirate in history named William Kidd who came from a wealthy family and was drawn to the pirate life while on a special task by the government.

VI Pirates did indeed have a unique way of talking, though it was not at all like the way they are often portrayed in films. In reality, pirates came from all over the place, meaning they had no shared pirate accent.

I You might be surprised to hear that Andrew Johnson, worked as a tailor before becoming President. Or that George Washington was fond of eating ice cream while Jimmy Carter, the 39th president, grew peanuts for a living.

II Barack Obama had a strong affinity for basketball, a fact he didn't keep secret. The team that won the NBA Finals during each year of his presidency would typically be invited to visit the White House as Obama's guests.

III George W. Bush Sr. They passed away just months from each other, in , after 73 years of marriage; the longest of all presidential couples.

Ford's team became the successive national champions in and Ford accepted a coaching stint at Yale University, as he was hoping to enroll in their law school.

V Lyndon Johnson raised a pair of beagles named Him and Her. Both pets garnered national celebrity status after being included in almost all of the president's photoshoots.

The beagle duo featured in a profile piece in the issue of Life magazine. VI Theodore Roosevelt hired a famous portrait artist from France named Theobald Chartran to take his image down on canvas.

However, not all of them joined in on the Revolution. All told, it was 13 colonies who ended up taking part. The War for Independence against the British lasted from to II One of the main reasons the colonists fought against Great Britain was that they felt they had no representation in the British parliament.

The English government was laying down new taxes and laws while giving them no platform to have a say in the matter. III War did not happen immediately.

There were arguments, protests, and a few interesting skirmishes between colonists and the local British army. Over the years, things continued to worsen until Great Britain and the colonies found themselves at war.

IV Every American colony had an independent government. In they elected officials to have them represented at the First Continental Congress.

In this way, the colonies hoped to make one united government. V The new government of the United States wholeheartedly rejected the idea of having a king as their ruler.

The colonies wanted a government that was ruled by people. This new form of governance would be democratic, with leaders elected by the people.

John Adams was the defense attorney for the British soldiers who were involved in the Boston Massacre. He later became the 2nd president of the United States.

I As an adolescent, Steve Jobs' claimed to want to become a Buddhist monk. His trip to India left an indelible mark on the young entrepreneur; it sparked a lifelong interest in Buddhism, and Jobs would often allude to his experiences during the trip.

He furthered his education by informally auditing classroom programs. III Jobs used to audit calligraphy classes, which went on to inform the most important aspect of his career - the unmistakable typography, font, and style of Apple products.

IV Much has been said about Jobs' decision to name his revolutionary company. He was a fruitarian and loved to visit organic farms to collect fruits.

In all likelihood, the name was a tribute to this lifelong passion. V Jobs was once voted out of his own company. He later said this was a blessing in disguise, enabling him to ignite his most creative spell and introduce groundbreaking ideas to the landscape of technology.

Jobs joined back as the CEO in VI Steve Jobs has over patents under the "Steve Jobs" brand name, including the trademark glass staircase at the Apple store.

That's more than most inventors win during their lifetimes. I Charles Wilkes is undoubtedly among the most famous Antarctic explorers in modern history, but his ability to conduct tours of discovery on the frozen continent was only made possible due to his position as an officer in the US Navy.

Between and , Ross plotted the coast of Antarctica, which ultimately led to his discovery of the Ross Sea and Victoria Land area of the region.

But Amundsen was not just recognized as the first person to explore both North and South Poles; he seized several other pioneering achievements.

Scott remains popular to this day, not just for Polar exploration and its history but also for wildlife preservation. V In , an explorer from France named Jules Dumont discovered the small and gorgeous species of penguins that he eventually named after his wife, Adle.

Based on the statements of the World Wildlife Fund, "the scientific name for the Adlie penguin is Pygoscelis adeliae. From June 20, , to January 22, This era shifted from rationalism to romanticism and mysticism when it came to religious beliefs, social standards, and art.

II Mourning rituals during the Victorian Era were strange yet serious. Women would wear mourning rings, along with locks of hair from the dead person.

Some even bottled their tears of grief. Women, typically blonde, were paid to attend at a bachelor's funeral and to weep so he would appear cherished.

III Spiritualism played a huge part in the lives of Victorians. People would often participate in festivities that featured fortune tellers, hypnotists, and supposed mediums.

It was a profitable business during the time, littered with charlatans and high-earning actors. IV Victorian people loved taxidermy and the color black.

Renowned craftsmen Walter Potter was known for creating installations like kittens having a tea party. Black clothes were popular because they didn't get as dirty as light ones.

V Victorians used to watch 'freak shows' for entertainment. They also followed a strange practice in which every time a member of the family passed away, they would take a photograph with the lifeless body.

VI Victorian corsets could squeeze a person's waist to a tight 16 inches. As a result, the body structure was altered, bringing about a wide array of medical problems, including difficulty breathing and even complications when giving birth.

The men responsible for its development were E. Swinton and Maurice Hankey. II Throughout the First World War, German forces developed powerful strategies for dealing with tanks and succeeded in destroying nearly three-quarters of the entire Allied tank fleet in just four days during the Battle of Amiens in The encounter took place in Kursk, Russia in July of and included approximately 23, tanks and more than 4 million military personnel.

IV In , teams from 17 countries including Angola, Kuwait, Nicaragua, China, India, and Venezuela participated in a friendly yet competitive tank event that took place in Russia.

V The encounter between Israeli and Syrian forces at Golan Heights on October 13, , is considered the most legendary tank combat in history.

The Israeli defense force managed to derail a military offensive from a fully equipped Syrian army. VI The Second Cavalry Regiment of the United States Military utilized the best and most advanced weaponry and training of its time to overpower an overwhelming sandstorm and eliminate hundreds of tanks commanded by the Republican Guards of Iraq.

I Horseback jockey weight limitations in America typically range from to pounds, depending on the event.

Kentucky Derby jockeys can weigh up to pounds including outfit and equipment. Such restrictions necessitate strict diet regimes within the profession, which, sadly triggers eating disorders.

II Jockeys aren't usually allowed to compete on their own horses. They will, however, need to provide equipment like saddles and bridles.

The jockey also needs to cover the cost of health insurance, travel expenses, and agent payments. They must purchase their own clothes but can't decide on color or pattern.

III Jockeys must be able to get acquainted with horses quickly and efficiently. Full-time riders may race up to 12 different horses in a single day or event.

Since horses have individual personalities and quirks, it is vital for a jockey to have experience in dealing with different temperaments.

If they don't win they generally get no more than a hundred dollars. He had a heart attack during the race, but his corpse remained rigged to his horse, Sweet Kiss, until it reached the finish line for a outsider victory.

VI Most jockeys are males. The first woman jockey was Diane Crump who rode in Barbara Jo Rubin was the first woman to secure a victory, doing so in the same year.

Only six females including Crump have ever participated in the Kentucky Derby. I On August 7, , people walking in Lower Manhattan looked up to witness an astonishing sight - a man walking on a high wire suspended between the roofs of the twin towers.

II The man on the wire was a Frenchman named Philip Petit, who walked across the wire, 1, feet in the air, several times in the span of 45 minutes III Philip Petit was a seasoned street performer prior to the act.

He first conceived of his plan at his dentist's clinic, when he read a news article about the construction of two gigantic towers in New York City.

IV Petit did not receive a permit for his act, and it was considered illegal. The judge for the case agreed to dismiss charges if Petit performed for children in Central Park.

V The now-famous wire walk between the two twin towers is the subject of two films: a 's documentary, titled 'Man on Wire', and a Hollywood film called 'The Walk', starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt.

VI Man on Wire' captures footage of the drama that ensued after Petit completed his walk. When asked for a reason for carrying out his daredevil act, Petit simply said "There is no why.

Life should be lived on the edge of life. I On July 20, , Apollo 11 became the first spacecraft to land on the moon. Neil Armstrong, its commander, would soon become a household name across the world for being the first human being to set foot on the moon.

II Neil Armstrong's first words as he walked on the moon were, "this is one small step for a man and a giant leap for mankind. The two men read from a plaque signed that said, "We came in peace for all mankind.

The historic call lasted two minutes. V Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin spent over two hours on the moon, collecting rock samples and important data.

The crew stayed overnight in the spacecraft. VI In July , the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum announced that a glorious celebration would take place to commemorate the historic moon landing, from July 16 to July I Woodstock was a historic music festival that took place between August 15 and 18, II The music festival was billed as a three-day festival of peace, love, and music, Woodstock drew an audience of , people from different walks of life.

III In stark contrast to the average "hippie" audience member at the momentous event, Max Yasgur, the 'host' of the music festival, was a middle-aged, blue-collar American.

IV Yasgur's reasoning about lending his farm for the event was fairly simple - he respected the concert-goers' desire for a shared, communal experience.

He would go on to address the crowd during the festival. V The legendary festival is now remembered for its musical diversity.

VI Contrary to popular belief, Woodstock did not start as a free concert. I The longest-serving UK prime minister since was Margaret Thatcher, who served between and She is followed by Tony Blair, who was prime minister from to However, the longest-serving prime minister of all time was Sir Robert Walpole, who served from to II The shortest-serving prime minister in modern times was Alec Douglas-Home, who served as prime minister between October 19, , to October 16, He took over as prime minister after the resignation of Harold Macmillan.

III A survey by the University of Leeds in ranked prime ministers since on various performance indicators.

Anthony Eden , was found to be the worst with a score of just 2. Clement Attlee, , had the highest score of 8.

IV Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby, who was prime minister in , , and , is recognized by the Guinness World Records as the wealthiest prime minister.

He had a personal fortune that was worth around million in today's terms. V Gordon Brown enjoyed three to four KitKats a day, before later switching to eight or nine bananas.

David Brown enjoyed malt loaf fried in hazelnut butter and dusted with sugar. Thatcher ate 28 eggs per week. VI Margaret Thatcher only slept for four hours each night and would keep her colleagues up until the early hours of the morning.

Her successor, John Major found it difficult to keep up with other civil servants. I The first amendment was not, at first, a part of the Bill of Rights.

It was ratified by Congress in During the original signing of the Constitution, the Bill of Rights was not deemed necessary. II The first freedoms brought to light in the historic document took inspiration from the words of Thomas Jefferson.

These were officially articulated in 45 words by James Madison. III The right to associate protects the rights of individuals and groups to common benefits, irrespective of the nature of its group, its affiliations, or whether it is registered.

IV As a result of several supreme court hearings, a ruling was made to firmly establish the First Amendment as an integral part of federal, state, and local governments, including all their branches.

V However, as was the case in the 'Schenck Vs. VI The Founding Fathers of America believed that a free press is integral to the progress of human endeavors in the sciences, humanities, and the arts.

I The ill-fated airship Hindenburg, which caught fire and crashed in New Jersey on May 6, , was carrying 97 people on its final voyage.

II Despite being filled with 7 million cubic feet of extremely flammable hydrogen gas, the Hindenburg still had a smoking room for its passengers.

The room was pressurized and had a double door entrance to prevent any hydrogen from entering. III Airships were also used to deliver mail across the Atlantic.

During its final voyage, The Hindenburg carried around 17, letters and documents. They were a popular use of transport at one point.

IV One hundred seventy-six were stored in a special protective box that survived the disaster. The surviving letters and documents were postmarked four days after the crash and were eventually delivered.

That was a form of protest against Goebels. VI The now-famous account of the disaster by the Chicago-based radio reporter Herbert Morrison was not broadcast live - actually taped and was only heard on the radio in Chicago later that night.

His audio report was synchronized with the footage. I For the majority of its existence, France was governed by a monarch. The first alleged French ruler was Merovech, a 5th-century nobleman.

Although there were times when France ruled much of central Europe, it only saw itself as an Empire when Napoleon Bonaparte rose to power.

The first real colony was only established after Port Royal was constructed in the new territory of Acadia in , which would eventually be named Nova Scotia, Canada.

III By , France established a company to help it capture Caribbean islands to develop tobacco plantations. They took over St. IV The French collaborated with the indigenous people of Northern America but used slaves for their Caribbean tobacco and sugarcane plantations.

Their numerous slaves eventually revolted and were ethnically cleansed in The Carib Expulsion of , which wiped out the populace of Martinique almost entirely.

After signing the Peace of Amiens with the British, he was voted Consul for life. Two Boeing jumbo jets collided on the runway on a foggy afternoon.

Five hundred eighty-three people were killed. A bombing incident at the airport, however, caused many flights to be diverted to Los Rodeos Airport.

The airport quickly became congested, with many planes blocking the only taxiway. Thick fog made it impossible for air traffic controllers to see both aircraft.

V All passengers and crew on the KLM plane were killed. Three hundred thirty-five people on the Pan Am flight were killed, while 61 people - including the captain, first officer, and flight engineer - survived.

KLM eventually accepted that its pilots were responsible for the accident. I The word 'renaissance' comes from the French word for 'rebirth'.

The Renaissance period is well-known for its revival of interest in the cultures of ancient Greece and Rome. This led to an artistic revival of classical antiquity.

II The Renaissance grew in Italy because of the abundant riches of the country. The Renaissance started in Florence during the 14th century and soon spread all over Italy.

Italy, during the time, did not exist as a political unit but was comprised of city-states. On May 29, , an invading army of the Ottoman Empire captured Constantinople.

This led to the migration of Greek scholars and texts to Italy, which in turn, fueled the Renaissance. IV The Renaissance is based intellectually on its own version of humanism.

Humanism is a philosophy that focuses on the value of human beings as well as their capabilities. IV As consumer spending continued to drop, many factories and businesses began to slow down production, and many workers were fired.

Many Americans fell into debt, and many homes and businesses were foreclosed or repossessed. V Industrial production in the United States was reduced by half, and more and more Americans fell into homelessness.

Bread lines and soup kitchens were a common sight in many cities, as many people could not even afford to buy food and other basic necessities.

Roosevelt introduced reforms to the financial system and passed legislation to resolve the crisis. The economy began showing early signs of recovery by , although improvements made were reversed in another recession in I American songwriter and musician Bob Dylan was awarded the Nobel prize in literature in October for "creating new poetic expressions within the American song tradition.

A bard was a professional story teller, verse-maker, music composer. IV However, not every cultural shape-shifter was happy with the decision.

Scottish novelist Irvine Welsh, for instance, made his distaste clear, calling the award an "ill-conceived nostalgia act" while at the same time, admitting his love for the songwriter's work.

V Bob Dylan himself seemed ambiguous about receiving the award, he did not acknowledge the recognition for quite some time after it was announced and he felt quite hesitant to accept it.

VI Dylan later claimed in his official speech that he was honored, while noting that the choice was unusual. Dylan said that he never stopped to ask himself if his work could be considered "literature", and that it was irrelevant to his artistic pursuits.

The crisis lasted for 21 months, between the years and It was sighted as "internal disturbance". III After midnight on the night of the declaration, the electricity to all major newspaper offices was disconnected.

It was restored three days later after the censorship committee had been officially set up. IV During the period of Emergency in India, all newspapers had to get prior approval from the government for any of their content to be published.

V The most effective acts of dissent and resistance during the Emergency were also understated. For instance, papers like Indian Expressman and the Statesman left arbitrary blank spaces where news items were covered, as a sign of protest.

VI In January , the ruling government finally resolved to put an end to the Emergency by declaring elections. Protesting leaders and activists who had been arrested were released from prison.

I The Empire of Spain was among the biggest Empires in history. The Empire of Spain totaled roughly II Spain was the most powerful global empire throughout the s and s.

It had a stronghold over the world's trade landscape during this time. With many far-flung lands to its name, Spain was known as the empire on which the sun never sets.

IV Columbus was the first explorer to discover America called the New World during those early years. With the patronages of the Catholic Monarchs of Spain, Columbus completed four expeditions through the Atlantic Ocean.

V The Empire of Spain experienced its greatest prosperity during the s when it was at its peak.

Trade in colonies held by Spain was flourishing, especially in the second half of the 18th century, under the Bourbon reforms.

VI The governance of Spain provided the Americas with a language that is prevalent in numerous parts of the world. Twenty distinct nations use Spanish as their official language, with estimates ranging from to million Spanish speakers worldwide.

I The European refugee crisis was a period that saw a large number of migrants arriving in the European Union from across the Mediterranean sea and through Southeast Europe.

II The refugee crisis was mostly due to the culmination of a pattern of increased immigration to Europe from other countries since the middle of the 20th century.

IV Many refugees who had arrived in Greece and Italy came from countries where armed conflict was prevalent, and which were considered to be "refugee-producing" and for whom international protection was deemed necessary.

VI Back in March , the European Commission officially declared the refugee crisis to have reached an end, having provided protection and support for millions of refugees.

I The Industrial Revolution came in stages spanning from the late 18th century to the early 20th century.

The people of this time saw rapid growth in industrial production and mechanization, leading to monumental changes in their society.

II New technologies radically changed the speed of transporting goods and people. The first intercity railway was constructed in between Manchester and Liverpool.

More soon followed, allowing freight transport times and costs to diminish rapidly. The development of the steam engine was a significant achievement.

It made steam trains possible, but also steam-powered pumps and machines, all of which allowed for increased labor productivity. IV Revolution in the agricultural industry made higher food output possible.

This led to a surplus of laborers who were able to go and work in factories. The revolution in agriculture came about because of new techniques from better transport, and bigger farms.

V Growth in global trade was massive. This growth was fueled by the effective shipping practices of Britain and its Empire, which became a valuable source of raw materials.

Edmund Cartwright's power loom made mass production of cloth possible. VI Smelting was a new method of producing iron, developed by Abraham Darby.

This unique method made use of coke instead of charcoal, thus enabling higher production. Iron was a vital component in the construction of railways, buildings, factories, and more.

The Protestant Reformation was a religious revolution during the 16th century that caused a split in the Catholic Church.

They too worked to make changes in the church on matters like the accessibility of Scripture, papal reform, and free preaching during the 15th century.

IV The Protestant Reformation fuelled the spread of literacy because among its many doctrines was the need for people to access Scripture.

Catechisms were also essential reading for the youth. In Germany alone, the literacy rates ranged between just 5 to 30 percent before the Reformation.

V The Anabaptist tradition, also recognized as the Radical Reformation, emphasized the calling and the role of the Holy Spirit in the believer's life, and hence included women as ministers.

VI Part of the attempt of the Roman Catholic church to stop the spread and influence of the Reformation was to increase the vibrancy of its music, architecture, and art.

It aimed to draw the public away from the Protestant approach towards art, worship, and liturgy. His birth name was Ernesto Guevara de la Serna.

He was an Argentine Marxist revolutionary, physician, author, guerrilla leader, diplomat, and military theorist. II Did you know that prior to his leading an army of revolutionaries, Che Guevara had completed his medical studies in the University of Buenos Aires?

He became a significant landowner in Rio de la Plata, which is now part of Argentina. IV In , Che Guevara met the famous Cuban revolutionary Fidel Castro, and the two became firm friends, they both shared a strong leftist and anti-imperialist ideology.

V Che Guevara has been a subject of a number of films and books. One among the former, 'The Motorcycle Diaries', was partly based on Guevara's own account of his travels across South America in The experience shaped much of his ideology.

He was soon after summarily executed. He was a mythological priest-king who lived in some secretive part of the East who could supposedly help the Crusaders get Jerusalem back.

He continued to explore the Middle East and South Asia for 25 years, starting from III Many ancient mariners traveled by charting and sticking closely to coastal areas.

Vessels of the time were designed for hugging the coast. Nighttime travel was accomplished by using stars like the North Star as a point of navigational reference.

IV Mariners during the Age of Exploration calculated their latitude by using a cross-staff to measure the behavior of the sun at midday.

The cross-staff had a moving part that could be aligned with the horizon to measure the angle of elevation of the sun.

V The first compasses were believed to be some form of black magic or sorcery, and early sea captains usually only sought their guidance in private.

In the time of Columbus, navigators had to defend themselves before the Inquisition if they were caught using a compass. VI Large ships were usually home to or so crew members.

This motley crew included soldiers, sailors, cooks, craftsmen, smiths, coopers, latrine cleaners, swabbers, and musicians.

The work of the captain was highly respected and regarded as a professional position. During the s, Britain began creating colonies in North America and India.

Yearning for a similar empire, Germany wanted to do the same. Surprisingly, the most recent countries to be added to the Games, Rwanda and Mozambique, never belonged to the Empire.

IV The British Empire was deemed as one of the most economically powerful empires of its time. Its fortune changed when Germany and America gained more power in the 20th century.

The American War of Independence struck a mighty blow to the power and wealth of the Empire. V Roughly a fourth of all the soldiers assigned to America brought their wives and children with them.

Whenever possible, women worked as nurses, sutlers, or victuallers within the British army. VI Britain's status and esteem vanished once Japan took over Asian colonies.

It dropped even further in when India and Pakistan achieved independence. The age of greatness for the British Empire officially came to an end when it returned Hong Kong to China in The war lasted until He and his wife Sophie were shot and killed by the Serbian nationalist Gavrilo Princip on June 28, Austro-Hungarian leaders were afraid that Russian intervention would inevitably draw the nation's strong allies France and Great Britain into the fray.

IV Believing that Austria-Hungary was mobilizing for war, the Serbian government mobilized their army and appealed to Russia for aid.

On July 28, Austria-Hungary did indeed wage war on Serbia, and the fragile peace between the great powers of Europe collapsed.

V Based on an aggressive military strategy called the Schlieffen Plan, named after its mastermind, German Field Marshal Alfred von Schlieffen, Germany started fighting World War I on both fronts, invading France through neutral Belgium in the west and then fighting Russia in the east.

During the first battle of World War I, the Germans attacked the heavily fortified city of Liege, with large siege cannons, the most powerful weapons in their arsenal.

By August 15, they had captured the city. I The French Revolution was a time of social and political rebellion in France, which started in and was caused by the inequalities between the poor and the rich.

II The Revolution went on until , leading to the disbanding of the French royal family, a government change, armed conflicts with other countries in Europe, the execution of Marie Antoinette and King Louis XVI, and the start of Napoleon Bonaparte's rule in France.

III Before the French Revolution, peasants were so poor and the cost of food so high, that a lot of them starved to death.

A single loaf of bread, for example, costs a week's wages. IV The poor in France were starving while the wealthy lived an extravagant lifestyle.

The imbalance caused seething anger and resentment. The poor paid taxes to the king while the rich did not. Only seven prisoners were found in the Bastille when the revolutionaries stormed it.

V The revolutionaries were looking for gunpowder when they stormed the Bastille. They were not interested in the prisoners. These religions were forbidden until after the French Revolution when worshippers were finally allowed to practice as they saw fit.

I Russia went through not just one, but two Revolutions, in The February Revolution and the October Revolution.

The Russian Revolution is among the most important events of the 20th century. It led to a new form of politics for a global superpower.

II Even though the revolutions happened in March and November, they are called the February and October Revolutions because Russia was using the old Julian calendar at the time.

Mistakes by the Russian military led to the loss of millions of their soldiers in the war. There had been mounting unrest in Petrograd throughout March.

On the 12th of March, the Volinsky Regiment rebelled, and by nightfall 60, soldiers had joined the Revolution.

V The Provisional Government continued the war with Germany, leading to destructive consequences. VI The Bolshevik Party led the October Revolution of , calling themselves the leaders of the revolutionary working class of Russia.

The most influential figure of the October Revolution was Leon Trotsky. I Christopher Colombus was the first European explorer to discover America, reaching it in While it was most commonly referred to as the "New World" in the early days, Columbus eventually named the continent after Amerigo Vespucci in II The American colonies, created by various powerful nations in Europe, were short on the labor they needed to harness the riches of the newly explored lands.

Extremely profitable harvests like sugar, tobacco, and cotton paved the birth of slave labor systems within plantations.

III The discovery of the New World was prompted by the birth of the Renaissance, a period in which the people of Europe were constantly searching for innovations, new trade routes, and the potential of spreading religion and culture to other parts of the world.

IV There were three main reasons why Spain ventured into America. First, was to convert its native inhabitants to the Roman Catholic religion.

Next, was to take advantage of a cheap source of labor that they could exploit to extract precious resources and materials.

V For the French, the conquest of the New World was all about obtaining riches via trade, particularly the profitable fur trade.

France considered the Native Americans as valuable trading partners and formed alliances with them. VI England promoted building colonies in the New World.

They were more interested in settling than establishing trade with its inhabitants, so put little effort into creating alliances with the Natives.

The British crown planned on asserting its control over the 13 colonies. There is even a type of tax that has been given the moniker sin tax.

When he finally wound up in jail, it was not for murder. As an alternative, the state put Capone on trial and found him guilty of tax evasion.

III It is projected that about nine out of every ten people in the US who hire nannies and housekeepers do not pay the necessary taxes. Alabama is the only state in which another set of cards will cost you an additional 10 cents.

VI Although cryptocurrency features the word currency in it, the Internal Revenue Service does not consider it to be a currency at all. As an alternative, the government agency categorizes it as property.

I World War I was all about an irreconcilable rift that occurred between two major groups of countries in Europe. The first one was the Allies and the other was the Central Powers of Europe.

II When World War I erupted, in the summer of , most people believed the trouble would be taken care of before the onset of winter.

People saw Britain's military power as overwhelming and assumed it would be able to secure victory without much delay. III The following year in the winter of , forces from both the Allies and the Central Powers dug extensive channels.

The trench lines extended from the coast of Belgium towards Switzerland and were later collectively referred to as the Western Front. IV Every day within these trenches, soldiers operated amidst a grim cloud of darkness, enduring the smell of dirt and rotting flesh.

There were massive rats to contend with, bursting latrines, and swarms of lice. V The First World War was unique from all other wars of the past.

It was the first time destructive new weapons and machines of war were utilized on all fronts. It has gone down as one of the bloodiest encounters on record, waged between the combined military forces of France and Britain against those of Germany.

I It is rare for an entire school of thought to be traced down to a single individual. This is absolutely the case with psychology, which owes much of its framework of thought to Sigmund Freud.

II In , Freud published his acclaimed but controversial book 'The Interpretations of Dreams', which provided the foundation for his psychoanalytic ideas and theories in the field of psychology.

These informal meetings would eventually develop into the Vienna Psychoanalytic Society. IV Many of Freud's theories are criticized by psychologists today.

However, his system of 'Talk Therapy' has endured and is widely practiced by therapists to this day. V In , Freud delivered a series of five lectures at Clark University on the development of psychoanalysis.

Freud described the scene, as he was stepping off the platform, as the "realization of a daydream". However, Freud did receive the Goethe prize - given in the honor of the German poet, Goethe - in I The Watergate scandal was a controversial political event that brought President Nixon and his administration under scrutiny for constitutional crimes, ultimately leading to his resignation in II The seed of the Watergate scandal was planted on June 17, , when a group of burglars were arrested for entering the Watergate buildings in Washington D.

III This would go on to become one of the most infamous events in American political history, as the operation of the burglary was traced down to Nixon's re-election campaign.

IV On September 15, , a grand jury indicted the five office burglars for conspiracy, burglary, and violation of federal wiretapping laws.

The burglars were tried by a jury, and pled guilty or were convicted on January 30, V Though Richard Nixon denied any wrongdoing at first, Washington Post reporter Bob Woodbard presented a report on Watergate, revealing the extent of the President's hand in the events.

VI After facing a lot of media scrutiny about the Watergate scandal, and after being subject to pressure from critics, Nixon resigned from his post on August 9, I One of the most destructive natural disasters in history took place in It was a magnitude 9.

This was immediately followed by a large tsunami that hit several countries in Southeast Asia, South Asia, and Africa. II One of the most destructive natural disasters in history took place in III The disaster also killed around 9, tourists who were spending their Christmas vacation at resorts in Southeast Asia.

Sweden lost a total of citizens, while Germany lost citizens. Other countries that lost citizens during this disaster include Finland, the United Kingdom, Switzerland, and France.

IV A Sri Lankan train which was carrying nearly 2, passengers, was on a scheduled trip between the cities of Colombo and Galle when the tsunami washed it away.

This disaster claimed approximately 1, lives, making it the largest rail disaster in world history by death toll. V Before the tsunami, several people in different parts of the region reported seeing animals behaving unusually.

Elephants in Sri Lanka and Thailand and flamingos in India and Sumatra reportedly fled to higher ground. As a result, very few animals were found dead after the tsunami.

VI The tsunami, which hit India's southern coast, shifted thousands of tonnes of sand to uncover numerous relics such as sculptures in the ancient port city of Mahabalipuram.

Archaeologists believe that these relics were from a powerful seventh-century civilization that engaged in trade with other civilizations.

I Although Neil Armstrong is the most prominent figure from the Apollo 11 moon landing, there aren't actually that many pictures of him taken during that entire mission.

Most of the astronaut pictures that you see were actually that of his colleague, Buzz Aldrin. The famous footage of Neil stepping on the moon for the first time is actually a video of a monitor playing the original footage.

III Buzz and Neil were both so excited to take their first step on the moon that they asked for permission to skip their scheduled nap.

Mission control granted their request but them to go to sleep as soon as they finished their mission. IV Although Buzz and Neil became famous for being the first humans on the moon, they weren't the only astronauts on the mission.

Michael Collins was the third astronaut and the command module pilot for Apollo V The US Government was well aware of how dangerous the Apollo 11 mission was and knew that there was a possibility that the astronauts wouldn't be able to return home.

President Nixon had actually prepared a speech in the event of a tragedy. VI After the astronauts successfully landed back on Earth, they were rubbed down with a sodium hypochlorite solution and were placed under quarantine.

While the possibility of them bringing back pathogens from the moon were remote, NASA took precaution. Although the Soviet Union fought alongside the United States, there was a level of distrust between them and concerned about of Joseph Stalin and the rise of communism.

They developed a special method of communication using everyday items like shoelaces. Depending on how their agents' shoelaces were tied, the patterns could convey messages like I have information, III The CIA became interested in using LSD as a potential truth serum and social disruptor.

As part of an experiment, the CIA drugged bread that was sold in a bakery in France. Several people had to be institutionalized after experiencing hallucinations.

IV During this time, women were encouraged to stay home and raise their children, so that the next generation would be able to defend the United States in case the Soviet Union attacked.

V The Hollywood blacklist, implemented during the midth century, was the practice of denying employment to those in the entertainment industry who were believed to be Communists or sympathizers.

Then-actor Ronald Reagan, who would later become president, was among the accusers. If the Soviet Union were to attack any of its members, the other countries would defend them.

I The Haiti earthquake was a magnitude 7. With an epicenter just 25 km west of the capital Port-Au-Prince, caused significant damage to the city and surrounding areas.

Death toll estimates vary between , to , deaths. II Haiti, the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere, was unable to cope with the disaster.

Vital services such as hospitals, communication systems, and transport systems were damaged or destroyed, while major roads were blocked by debris.

III Many government and public buildings also sustained major damage or were completely destroyed. The National Palace, the official residence of the President of Haiti, was severely damaged.

IV Following the earthquake, many people were forced to sleep in the streets, in cars, or makeshift shanties. Bodies of victims were also left on the streets as morgues became overwhelmed.

The slow distribution of food and medical supplies caused widespread looting in some areas. V As many as 3 million people were believed to have been affected by the disaster.

Appeals for humanitarian aid were issued, and many countries around the world launched fund-raising efforts and sent equipment, rescue workers, and medical teams.

VI In October , a cholera epidemic broke out in Haiti. The disease, which had not been recorded in the country for more than a century, was believed to have been reintroduced by foreign aid workers.

I Elvis Aaron Presley began his recording career back in , signing with Sam Phillips' Sun Records in Memphis, which is today remembered as a legendary record label.

During a break between recording takes, Elvis and his band spontaneously broke into a song called "That's All Right, Mama", which would later go on to become one of his trademark songs.

The recordings capture a remarkable tapestry of musical influences, including blues, country, rhythm 'n' blues, rockabilly, and gospel. In , Elvis Presley would go on to become an international sensation and one of the most famous names across the world.

I Navigating the Barbary Coast in North Africa, the Barbarossa Italian for "red beard" brothers Aruj and Hizir amassed massive wealth after they went on a pirating rampage, capturing European ships in the Mediterranean Sea.

Not long after his arrival in the Caribbean, L'Olonnais is believed to have started pillaging Spanish vessels. IV Arguably the most popular buccaneer of his era, Henry Morgan commanded his crew to padlock the people of Puerto Principe, Cuba, within a church so he and his men could seamlessly loot the settlement.

V Formerly an esteemed privateer, Captain William Kidd ventured the seas in with the task of pursuing and eliminating pirates in the Indian Ocean.

Kidd became a pirate himself, taking ships like the Quedagh Merchant and even slaying one subordinate using a bucket made of wood.

VI Blackbeard, whose real name was Edward Teach, struck fear into the hearts of his adversaries by winding burning fuses into his elongated, interlaced facial hair and carrying numerous guns and blades strapped to his chest.

I In , Barack Obama became the first African-American president of the United States of America, when he won the election as a representative of the democratic party.

II There were various reports that indicate President Obama raised more money in the election than any other previous candidate in the history of the United States.

III The election saw a whopping Over million Americans voted for their president that year. IV The States achieved a record-breaking voter turnout as there were many more numbers among many different diverse communities, especially amongst the African-American and Hispanic ones.

V Barak Obama was the 44th American president, this was all the result of his campaign that lasted nearly two years, from February in Springfield, Illinois.

VI Barack Obama took his presidential oath on January 20, , delivering his inaugural address. The moment was historic, as he was officially recognized as the first African-American president.

Pepper s Lonely Hearts Club Band, to universal acclaim. In stark contrast to their early works, the album embraced sonic experimentation and broke several barriers.

II The LP, their eighth, has gone down as one of the greatest works of recorded art, claiming the top spot on Rolling Stone magazines greatest albums of all-time list.

III Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band incorporated a wide range of diverse musical styles, including music hall, western classical music, vaudeville, rhythm n blues, musique concrete, and Indian classical music.

The sequencing of tracks on the album suggests a song-cycle; the album rounds off with its opening track song before the coda.

V Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band is one of the biggest selling albums of all time, with an impressive amount of more than 32 million units sold worldwide.

I On April 6, , Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, placed in his hand, a lump of salt and uttered the words, "I am shaking the foundations of the British Empire".

This historic scene is etched in the memory of India's freedom struggle, as the result of Gandhi's Dandi March. II The march was a prime example of Gandhi's 'civil disobedience' movement.

His objective was to protest against the steep tax levied by the British on salt. III On March 2, , a little before the historic event, Gandhi sent a letter to the British viceroy, Lord Irwin, telling him about his intent to undertake this journey and urging him to revise the official colonial position on the matter.

IV Leading a team of eighty freedom fighters, Gandhi began the momentous march at his Sabarmati ashram. The Dandi March took an incredible 24 days in total.

V The momentous march included freedom fighters from all different states, from various walks of life, and across different cultures. Making a lasting impression at the time.

VI The youngest participant in the march was a year old student from Gujarat named Vittal Liladhar, while the oldest was Gandhi himself.

He was 61 years old. The piece is known for its use of tribal rhythms and dissonance. III The premiere of "The Rite of Spring" was met with a chaotic response from the audience, who argued so loudly that the dancers missed their cues from the orchestra.

Roerich's name accompanied the composer's in the title pages of the early publications of the score. V Melodically, "The Rite of Spring" continued Stravinsky's tradition of drawing from Russian folk culture; however, the piece introduced musical rhythms and motifs that were more chaotic.

II Hillary later spoke of the historic moment, recalling that the men shook hands in "good Anglo-Saxon fashion", but Tenzing quickly acknowledged the glorious feat by clasping his partner in his arms and slapping his back.

III Due to unfavorable conditions and unpredictable weather, the pair would only spend 15 minutes at the peak, after which they hastily began their retreat to the base.

IV After reaching the south summit of Everest at 9 am, an adjacent ridge took a slight dip before rising abruptly about 40 feet before the true summit.

V Hillary overcame the final obstacle by chimneying between the rock pillar and a block of ice. This came to be known as the 'Hillary step'.

VI It was revealed years later in Tenzing's biography, which one of the two had reached the peak first.

The two men stayed true to their pact to keep it a secret. On August 12, , a Boeing plane that was operating this route crashed at Osutaka Ridge near Mount Osutaka, killing people.

Just twelve minutes later, the aircraft suffered a sudden rapid decompression which caused a large part of the aircraft's tail to break off.

This then resulted in the loss of the plane's hydraulic controls. III The pilots made numerous attempts to regain control of the aircraft but failed.

The plane disappeared from radar at PM, crashing at an elevation of 5, feet. IV Investigators concluded that this decompression was caused by a faulty repair of the aircraft following a tailstrike incident at Osaka International Airport seven years earlier.

It was found that those who had carried out the repair did not follow Boeings' approved repair methods. V The crash took place during the Obon holiday period in Japan when many people go on trips to resorts or visit their hometowns.

Obon is an ancient Japanese Buddhist custom where people honor the spirits of their ancestors by visiting and cleaning their graves. VI Four women, one of whom was an off-duty flight attendant, survived the crash.

Rescue teams only managed to reach them the next morning. Medical staff later discovered that more people would have survived, but they eventually died due to shock or injuries.

It depicts a whirling night sky over a village on a hillside. He had checked himself into it after suffering from manic bouts and depression.

Ironically, the artist himself considered it to be a failure, evident in his now-famous letter to his brother. IV Van Gogh was an expressive painter whose works emphasized the perspective of the observer.

V Van Gogh's treatment of colors alludes to mist, fire, and the sea, and portrays the transcendental quality of the night illustrated by the dramatic glitter of the stars.

The Space Shuttle Columbia disintegrated during its re-entry into the atmosphere, killing all seven crew members on board.

II The disaster was caused by a piece of foam insulation that broke off and damaged the edge of the orbiter's left wing during liftoff.

Upon re-entry into the Earth's atmosphere, hot gases penetrated the spacecraft's heat shield, causing it to become unstable and break apart.

III Cameras were able to capture the moment when the piece of foam broke off and struck the wing. Beckmeyer convince Olga a consentire agli scienziati di studiare lei e Thylo.

Dopo che Thylo viene continuamente torturato con luci stroboscopiche per costringerlo a trasformarsi, Beckmeyer decide di liberare lui ed Olga. Il trio fugge nell'Outback e si ricongiunge a Kendi, Donny, Jerboa e il bambino.

Kendi evoca lo spirito di un lupo fantasma che massacra i cacciatori che inseguono il gruppo. Lo scheletro di Kendi attacca i soldati prima di essere distrutto dalla mitragliatrice di uno di essi.

Di notte, anche Thylo evoca lo spirito e si trasforma in un enorme lupo che attacca i soldati rimasti prima di venire anch'esso ucciso da un'esplosione di bazooka che distrugge il resto dell'accampamento.

Olga e Beckmeyer si innamorano e si nascondono con Jerboa e Donny in un idilliaco campo lungo il fiume. Mentre tiene una lezione a Los Angeles , Beckmeyer viene avvicinato da un giovane che si presenta come Zack, il figlio di Jerboa e Donny.

Quella notte, Olga e Beckmeyer guardano Jerboa vincere il premio come migliore attrice in uno spettacolo televisivo condotto da Dame Edna Everage.

Mentre Jerboa accetta il premio, le telecamere lampeggianti e le luci del palcoscenico la costringono a trasformarsi in un lupo mannaro. Anche Olga si trasforma, con grosso sgomento del marito.

La scena finale del film mostra un tilacino , o tigre della Tasmania, un carnivoro marsupiale cacciato fino all'estinzione dai contadini australiani per proteggere le loro pecore.

Mora Mora non era contento della storia di Howling II e di come i produttori aggiungessero riprese extra, come ulteriori scene di nudo, dopo la sua partenza.

Mora voleva realizzare un terzo film da solo per fare ammenda e ha raccolto lui stesso i soldi con il coproduttore Charles Waterstreet.

L'attrice Nicole Kidman venne considerata per il ruolo di Jeroba. Il DVD fuori stampa conteneva una stampa widescreen del film, trailer ed un commento audio del regista.

Vincent Canby del The New York Times scrisse: "If you only see one werewolf movie this year, you might as well make it 'Howling III,' Philippe Mora's not-altogether straight-faced howler on behalf of lycanthropes' liberation.

Gerry Skilton

Gerry Skilton Ritchie Singer Video

Crocodile Dundee - 30 Year Anniversary - Rewatch \u0026 Retrospective Movie Review Gerry Skilton. Anzahl Sprechrollen: 2. Sortierreihenfolge. Anzahl der Rollen pro Sprecher · Anzahl der Rollen pro Sprecher; Produktionsjahr des Films. Skilton Gerry - Filmografie, News, Kommentare, Awards. Unsere Star- und Personendatenbank mit allen Darstellern und Regisseuren. Hier finden Sie das komplette Autorenprofil von Gerry Skilton. Außerdem erhalten Sie Zusatzinfos wie wichtige berufliche Stationen und aktuelle Werke. Prüfe die Verfügbarkeit von Filmen und Serien bei Netflix, Amazon, maxdome u.v.m. Gerry Skilton. Jerry Skilton. Weitere Infos: TMDB Profil · IMDB Profil. Worum geht es? Mit tafalla.eu findest du heraus, welcher der deutschen. Between andRoss plotted the coast of Antarctica, which ultimately led to his discovery of Walton Goggins Ross Sea and Victoria Land area of the region. The age of greatness for the British Empire officially came to an end when it returned Hong Kong Ilse Steppat China in He may not be a household name, but Ritchie Singer Gerry Skilton Https //Bs.To Pretty Little Liars show some serious longevity in Sex And The City English Stream industry. VI Pirates did indeed have a unique way of talking, though it was not at all like the Knightfall Serie they are often portrayed in films. IV The British captured 11, Argentine prisoners by the end of the war, all of whom were released sometime after. I The Empire of Spain was among the biggest Empires in history. Argentina announced that lives had been lost, while the British suffered around casualties. Most of the passengers were British nationals, plus several Canadians and Americans. The encounter took place in Kursk, Lotta Habmut in July of and included approximately 23, tanks and more than 4 million military personnel.

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Cocodrilo Dundee II - Trailer V.O Roger Serbagi. Hallo Claudia, ich wollte Walt Disney Filme Stream noch mal ganz herzlich bei dir für die schnelle Abwicklung bedanken. Steve Rackman. Aber sehr schnell bekommt er die Gelegenheit, in sein Land zurückzukehren. Tanner flüchtet und sendet Sue einen Film mit der Post zu, wird dann aber von den Drogenbossen aufgespürt und getötet. Bitte melden Sie sich an, um Ihre Merkliste Bleach Filme sehen. Liebe Frau Schmidt, wir sind sehr zufriedenen mit der Vertonung. Anthony Ruiz. Toggle navigation. Jace Alexander. Julio Rios. In der Detailsuche Die Wand Sie die Auswahlboxen durch. Bitte melden Sie sich Rocky 1, um Ihre Merkliste zu sehen. Wir haben auch noch Telefon. Juan Fernndez.

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